Recovery For Texas Energy

740_energy_oil_and_gas_image_7914 West Texas Oil Boom

In the midst of the shale boom in 2013, Texas added more than 19,000 new jobs in the oil and gas production sector, leading the U.S. job increase in the industry by a wide margin. But back then, global oil prices were stable all year around at US$100 and slightly more.

Crude prices have crashed since 2014—now barely clinging on to above US$50—effectively stagnating drilling activity and oil jobs growth.

Texas, for its part, has shed over 91,000 jobs in oil and gas industry since the end of 2014, with the Houston area economy on the cusp of a recession, according to an article in The Wall Street Journal.

The Dallas Fed has said that signs of recovery have emerged in the U.S. oil market, most notably in the Permian. The Dallas Fed also noted that Texas’s oil and gas employment increased in August—a first since 2014—suggesting that the worst of the energy crisis may be over.

“Increased activity in the Permian Basin and elsewhere has affected employment in the Texas mining sector, which rose slightly in August—its first increase since late 2014,” the Fed statement said.

The Dallas Fed issued probably the most bullish comment on the Texas oil economy so far this year, when Fed economist Pia Orrenius said that encouraging employment growth in Texas suggests that “the worst of the energy crisis may be over”.

In summary...So the latest numbers show that Texas has been overcoming this energy downturn – as it has done with many other lows – to continue to be the mainstay for America’s superpower status.

Reference:  Tsvetama Paraskova, October 14, 2016, Texas Is Making An Energy Recover, OilPrice, OilPrice.com